Edinburgh Festival

This is the new home for my Edinburgh Festival pages.

What you can find on these pages

picasion.com_ad4af54d1e0dba539bb99363628cc39eWe first visited the August Feast, as I came to call it, in 1991, and I subsequently drafted the initial content for my “An Edinburgh Festival Punter” website in 2005. You will find a reduced version of that site here.

The most popular page from the original content, by a country mile, is A History of the Edinburgh Festivals. Arguably vying for second place are Favourite Shows over the Years and A Potted History of “Auld Reekie”. See the August Feast page for a full list of the content. There are some festival aids which can be downloaded. Primarily, they provide skeleton forms which the serious punter can use to build her own festival schedule.

From 2006 to 2014 the content also included news, festival programme announcements, previews, reviews and a post-mortem. In general, I tried to provide links to material that had been penned by critics, journalists et cetera, rather than wittering on too much myself.  This material has been archived. I will in future post such information as blogs, albeit in a reduced form.

 What is All the Fuss About?

To get a flavour of the effect that the Edinburgh Festival can have on punters and artists alike, read …

Thinking of treading the boards?

Arguably, the most comprehensive guidance for would-be participants is Mark Fisher’s excellent book, The Edinburgh Fringe Survival Guide, which was published in early 2012. It covers all aspects of putting a show on from the interesting artistic aspects to the boring bureaucratic but essential elements. He followed this up by running a successful show at the 2012 Fringe which featured guests from all areas of the Fringe who were each able to relate their experiences. Audio recordings of these shows are available on Mark’s website.

The Fringe Society provides a number of guides which can be downloaded … The Fringe Guide to Doing a ShowThe Fringe Guide to Selling a ShowChoosing a Venue and Registering a Show.

The Fringe Society also runs a number of roadshows around January and February each year. They are part guidance and part PR and marketing.