December 2018 Update

This newsletter focuses on the options that will be available to WordPress users when version 5.0 is launched. As some of the options are not yet set in stone for WordPress.com users, I will, if necessary, re-issue this newsletter when they eventually become crystal clear. These items are in red in this issue.

Preamble

There have been five beta versions so far, and we are currently, at the time of writing, on release candidate 3. The general opinion is that it is not ready for release. In the November 2018 newsletter I said that the target launch date was November 27th, 2018, and that if it was not met then it would be put back to January 22nd, 2019.

Well, we have passed the first target date, but all the signs are that Mr. WordPress is intent on reneging on the backup date, and is pressing ahead to release it as soon as possible despite the clamour to delay it. Hence, I am writing this newsletter now rather than waiting for some unknown surprise date. In fact, I have just found out this morning that December 6th, 2018 is the new target date.

Some reported bugs are already being put on one side for resolution in 5.0.1 or later. These are the bug-fixing releases which may appear fortnightly.

I will cover the options for WordPress.org users and WordPress.com users separately. In each case I will mention the following topics: the installation of version 5.0; the default editor; and the choice of editor for individual posts / pages. Note – I will simply use the term post from now on rather than say post / page each time. Suffice it to say that where post is mentioned it also applies to page.

Options for WordPress.org users

As version 5.0 is a major release, you can decide whether to install it or not. You may sensibly decide to delay it until you are ready and you are confident that it is reliable. If you do propose to install it please ensure that any plugins that you use will work with version 5.0. As an aside, if you want better control of WordPress updates there is a popular plugin called Easy Updates Manager (over 200K activations) which you might check out.

You can disable the new Gutenberg editor in version 5.0 by using the Classic Editor plugin (or optionally the Classic Editor Addon plugin). This will allow you to continue to use the existing editor which will be supported until at the least the end of 2021.

If version 5.0 is installed and the Gutenberg editor is enabled you can still use the old editor for individual posts:

  • creating a new post with the Classic Editor. Do not click on add new post in the wp-admin dashboard, as that will bring up the Gutenberg editor. Click All posts instead, and select the appropriate editor from the dropdown box at the top left of the screen.
  • If you are editing an existing post and Gutenberg is enabled then clicking on the name will bring up the Gutenberg editor. However, hovering on the line below the name, as shown underneath, will display various options, including the Classic Editor, if you want to use it rather than Gutenberg.

Options for WordPress.com users

WordPress 5.0 will be installed. Unlike WordPress.org users, you have no say in the matter. There is a question mark, as to when this will happen. A sensible approach would be for them to launch it gradually to groups of users .. but who knows!

Enabling / disabling Gutenberg. At the time of writing, the majority of WordPress.com users can choose to try out Gutenberg or not on 4.9.8 (the current version of WordPress). However, There is no information on whether a similar option will be made available in 5.0, e.g. enable Gutenberg (or not).

Choice of editor for an individual post. There are two ways to use WordPress, via the original wp-admin dashboard or via the more recent Calypso front-end.

Wp-admin dashboard

If the Gutenberg editor is enabled you can still use the Classic Editor for individual posts:

  • creating a new post with the classic editor. Do not click on add new post in the wp-admin dashboard, as that will bring up the Gutenberg editor. Click All posts instead, and select the appropriate editor from the dropdown box at the top left of the screen.
  • If you are editing an existing post and Gutenberg is enabled then clicking on the name will bring up the Gutenberg editor. However, hovering on the line below the name will display various options, including Classic Editor, if you want to use it rather than Gutenberg.

Calypso

This alternative front-end was introduced in 2015. WordPress.com will try to persuade you to use it rather than the wp-admin dashboard. They say that it is faster. I must admit that I have not found it so, and it is also missing some of the features on the dashboard. Anyway, it is there and some of you may be using it. The accompanying image shows the top level menu for Calypso.

At the time of writing, there is no ability to choose the editor for a post. If Gutenberg is enabled you get the Gutenberg editor. If it is not enabled you get the Classic Editor. I guess that this may change in WordPress 5.0. We will have to wait and see.

Other Notes

The classic block. When you edit a post or page with Gutenberg for the first time the content will appear as a single classic block. You can retain this format if you wish. The formatting icons will effectively give you the same facilities as can be found in the Classic Editor. However, if you are happy to fully embrace Gutenberg then you can convert the content into multiple native Gutenberg blocks.

Switching Editors. If you go into the Gutenberg editor by mistake then simply exit it. If you have saved a post or page in the Gutenberg editor, and then you subsequently decide that you wish to revert to the Classic Editor, a message will inform you that some formatting may be lost in the process. So, beware.